October 24, 2006

I have been using delicious to keep track of links for a while and this was the second time i was ‘forced’ into tagging. the first time i was forced into using tagging was with the release of gmail. gmail was quite revolutionary in that instead of offering its users folders in which they could sort and store email messages, they had NO folders and were given ‘labels’, which were essentially just a different word for TAGS. There was a little bit of backlash, some irritation, and some praise when google released its gmail sans folders. one rebel, even ‘deciphered’ a way of still having folders… or so she thought… this is tagging still miss kim. I also use an online file storage application called esnips which incorporates tagging for files as well (and folders tooooo!)  

 like i said in my last post, tagging is the new folders… hmmm that doesn’t sound particularly grammatically correct… but ya know…

I am taking LIS 502 this semester and when we were learning Library of COngress Subject Headings, and all their confusion and rigidity assigning supplementary subject headings… for example,  a textbook on electricity could have an entire chapter or more devoted to magnetism… in subject headings, this becomes somewhat difficult to catalogue, and often times in the past, the book would have been catalogued by its primary subject heading ONLY, completely disregarding the chapter on magnetism   

Kroski states in her article:  “The wisdom of crowds, the hive mind, and the collective intelligence are doing what heretofore only expert catalogers, information architects and website authors have done. They are categorizing and organizing the Internet and determining the user experience, and it’s working. ”

By permitting tagging within the OPAC, we could capture these other subjects that are covered in works that are more often than not, disregarded entirely. imagine the fine-grain categorization that could be applied to each work… if you read a book on firetrucks, and they had a particularly indepth look at firehoses in chapter 2, you could tag the book with ‘firehoses’…. then anyone searching for ‘firehoses’ would come across your tag, and consequently, the book on firetrucks with the rich chapter on firehoses!!

Tag=Cataloging

October 24, 2006

I have been using delicious to keep track of links for a while and this was the second time i was ‘forced’ into tagging. the first time i was forced into using tagging was with the release of gmail. gmail was quite revolutionary in that instead of offering its users folders in which they could sort and store email messages, they had NO folders and were given ‘labels’, which were essentially just a different word for TAGS. There was a little bit of backlash, some irritation, and some praise when google released its gmail sans folders. one rebel, even ‘deciphered’ a way of still having folders… or so she thought… this is tagging still miss kim. I also use an online file storage application called esnips which incorporates tagging for files as well (and folders tooooo!)   like i said in my last post, tagging is the new folders… hmmm that doesn’t sound particularly grammatically correct… but ya know… I am taking LIS 502 this semester and when we were learning Library of COngress Subject Headings, and all their confusion and rigidity assigning supplementary subject headings… for example,  a textbook on electricity could have an entire chapter or more devoted to magnetism… in subject headings, this becomes somewhat difficult to catalogue, and often times in the past, the book would have been catalogued by its primary subject heading ONLY, completely disregarding the chapter on magnetism    Kroski states in her article:  “The wisdom of crowds, the hive mind, and the collective intelligence are doing what heretofore only expert catalogers, information architects and website authors have done. They are categorizing and organizing the Internet and determining the user experience, and it’s working. ” By permitting tagging within the OPAC, we could capture these other subjects that are covered in works that are more often than not, disregarded entirely. imagine the fine-grain categorization that could be applied to each work… if you read a book on firetrucks, and they had a particularly indepth look at firehoses in chapter 2, you could tag the book with ‘firehoses’…. then anyone searching for ‘firehoses’ would come across your tag, and consequently, the book on firetrucks with the rich chapter on firehoses!!

Tag=Cataloging

October 24, 2006

I have been using delicious to keep track of links for a while and this was the second time i was ‘forced’ into tagging. the first time i was forced into using tagging was with the release of gmail. gmail was quite revolutionary in that instead of offering its users folders in which they could sort and store email messages, they had NO folders and were given ‘labels’, which were essentially just a different word for TAGS. There was a little bit of backlash, some irritation, and some praise when google released its gmail sans folders. one rebel, even ‘deciphered’ a way of still having folders… or so she thought… this is tagging still miss kim. I also use an online file storage application called esnips which incorporates tagging for files as well (and folders tooooo!)  

like i said in my last post, tagging is the new folders… hmmm that doesn’t sound particularly grammatically correct… but ya know…

I am taking LIS 502 this semester and when we were learning Library of COngress Subject Headings, and all their confusion and rigidity assigning supplementary subject headings… for example,  a textbook on electricity could have an entire chapter or more devoted to magnetism… in subject headings, this becomes somewhat difficult to catalogue, and often times in the past, the book would have been catalogued by its primary subject heading ONLY, completely disregarding the chapter on magnetism   

Kroski states in her article:  “The wisdom of crowds, the hive mind, and the collective intelligence are doing what heretofore only expert catalogers, information architects and website authors have done. They are categorizing and organizing the Internet and determining the user experience, and it’s working. ”

By permitting tagging within the OPAC, we could capture these other subjects that are covered in works that are more often than not, disregarded entirely. imagine the fine-grain categorization that could be applied to each work… if you read a book on firetrucks, and they had a particularly indepth look at firehoses in chapter 2, you could tag the book with ‘firehoses’…. then anyone searching for ‘firehoses’ would come across your tag, and consequently, the book on firetrucks with the rich chapter on firehoses!!